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Review of the ATI 2016 Conference

Posted On October 18, 2016 By Jennifer Baldwin In Conference Reviews, Translating Innovation /   As a professional practice, I aim to attend at least one translation conference per year. Obviously, there are many benefits in attending conferences. I personally love conferences for networking, learning opportunities, and keeping a pulse on key topics and trends. Conferences are also a great way to explore other parts…

Role Expectations

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE ATI BOARD POSITIONS AVAILABLE, PLEASE SEE A DESCRIPTIONS BELOW: PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT TREASURER SECRETARY MEMBER AT LARGE VOLUNTEER

Elections are underway

  Dear ATI Members: The deadline for submission of Letters of Intent for the Board of Directors has been extended. See below: ATI encourages its members to consider becoming active participants of our board. If you are interested in obtaining more information about the positions and its role expectations, please contact any of our board members….

What Brexit Means for Literary Translation

By Lindsey Ford 20th September 2016 Photograph: Jeff Djevdet What does the UK’s vote to leave the European Union mean for our future? In particular, what does this mean for Free Word’s three focus themes: literary translation, free expression and stories of climate change? To find out, we asked the experts to explain the challenges and opportunities that this outcome brings….

A Moveable Feast: A Year of Reading Women in Translation

September 14, 2016  |  in News  |  by Chris Gribble, David Maclean, Harriet Gilbert, Joanna Walsh, and Sasha Dugdale In a genre that prides itself on celebrating diversity and shining a light on marginalised voices, women authors have consistently been overlooked. This August marked the third anniversary of #WomenInTranslation month, a much-needed attempt to redress the balance between male and female authors within…

How Did Latin Become A Dead Language?

POLITICS Sep 18, 2016 01:00 AM ET While Latin’s influence is apparent in many modern languages, it is no longer commonly spoken. So exactly why did the language die out? When the Catholic Church gained influence in ancient Rome, Latin became the official language of the sprawling Roman Empire. Latin was king of the world —…