Archive: Apr 2017

  1. Why the hand of the literary translator is everywhere

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    Why the hand of the literary translator is everywhere

    “I’ve been curious about whether some language communities export better than others ever since I learnt they go stone bananas for Donna Tartt in the Netherlands. But MacLehose says it’s often got more to do with the translator. Yet how seldom most readers even clock the names of these people on the dust jackets of their books. This is more than just an issue of giving credit where it is due: an influential translator can be the midwife to a whole canon or, for that matter, a whole national literature.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/TranslatorEverywhere

    “They go stone bananas for Donna Tartt in the Netherlands.”
    AFR.COM
  2. Bilingual babies. How does a child learn two languages at the same time?

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    Bilingual babies. How does a child learn two languages at the same time?

    “What do we know about the way babies learn to speak, particularly in bilingual households? A lot of scientists refer to their work as their ‘baby,’ but University of Western Sydney’s Dr Karen Mattock’s lab studies really do involve babies, especially those that are learning two languages at the same time. Listen to her fascinating description of the way babies in bilingual households learn to speak.”

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/LearnTwoSameTime

  3. Three Translators Respond to “Arrival”

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    Three Translators Respond to “Arrival”

    “We asked three top translators to watch [the movie] Arrival and to give us their two cents (via email) on the linguacentric feature: Hillary Gulley, translator from the Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, and instructor at CUNY—Queens College; Esther Allen, translator from the Spanish, French, and Portuguese and associate professor at CUNY Graduate Center and Baruch College; and Will Evans, translator from the Russian, president at Cinestate, founder of Deep Vellum Publishing, and cofounder of Deep Vellum Books. Here’s what they had to say.”

    Read on: http://bit.ly/TranslatorsRespond

  4. Critics say these are the best books translated into English from foreign languages this year

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    Critics say these are the best books translated into English from foreign languages this year

    “Through fiction, British boarding schools and American gym classes have been exported around the world. But what about stories from rural Poland, or the Norwegian coast, or Chinese mega-cities? For readers interested in books from beyond the English language, the prestigious Man Booker International Prize has some recommendations.”

    Read on: http://bit.ly/BestBooksTranslated

  5. Bad language: why being bilingual makes swearing easier

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    Bad language: why being bilingual makes swearing easier

    “Many bilinguals report ‘feeling less’ in their second language; it does not bear the same emotional weight as your native language. Feeling less emotionally connected to your second language might make it easier to use highly emotional vocabulary, which is precisely what I was experiencing with my ease of swearing and talking about sensitive topics in English. The scientific term for this is reduced emotional resonance of language. It is a fairly well-established phenomenon, but many specific questions still remain unanswered.”

    Read on: http://bit.ly/BilingualEasier