Archive: May 2017

  1. Multilingualism and the right to translation and interpreting in the EU, challenges for the future

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    Multilingualism and the right to translation and interpreting in the EU, challenges for the future

    “The multilingual nature of the European Union is one of its defining characteristics, but what are the real linguistic rights of EU citizens when it comes to understand and to be understood in another Member State? How are translation and interpreting regulated at the EU level?”

    Read on: http://bit.ly/TranslationInterpretingEU

  2. Friend or Faux? The Linguistic Trickery of False Friends

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    Friend or Faux? The Linguistic Trickery of False Friends

    “False friends, as many may already know firsthand from their own unfortunate linguistic encounters, are those confusing words and phrases that appear or sound identical or similar to words in their own language, yet have different meanings or senses….The existence of false friends can have a major impact on how information is received by people across different cultures, cause serious offense and misunderstandings, and can actually start to change languages, exerting pressure on how the semantics might shift, through influential contact from other word senses.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/FriendFaux

    “‘Gift’ means ‘poison’ in German. This may lead to confusion.”
    DAILY.JSTOR.ORG
  3. Language shapes how the brain perceives time

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    Language shapes how the brain perceives time

    “Language has such a powerful effect, it can influence the way in which we experience time, according to a new study. Linguists have discovered that people who speak two languages fluently think about time differently depending on the language context in which they are estimating the duration of events.”

    Read on: http://bit.ly/LanguageShapesTime

  4. More than an oppressor’s language: reclaiming the hidden history of Afrikaans

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    More than an oppressor’s language: reclaiming the hidden history of Afrikaans

    “Rather than viewing Afrikaans through a single lens it is today acknowledged as an amalgam consisting of a variety of expressions, speakers and histories.”

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/HistoryAfrikaans

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    More than an oppressor’s language: reclaiming the hidden history of Afrikaans

    “Rather than viewing Afrikaans through a single lens it is today acknowledged as an amalgam consisting of a variety of expressions, speakers and histories.”

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/HistoryAfrikaans

  5. Randolph native wins MIT prize for real-time Braille translator

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    Randolph native wins MIT prize for real-time Braille translator

    “Thank township native Tania Yu for developing a portable device that may one day help the visually impaired translate print text to Braille in real time. The 22 year-old Yu, a senior at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., is part of a six-member team—all women—who won the 2017 Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for undergraduates.”

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/BrailleTranslator

    “I really want to help improve humanity.”
    NEWJERSEYHILLS.COM

     

  6. The Translate Iowa Project releases its first publication

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    The Translate Iowa Project releases its first publication

    “Although founded only a little more than a year ago, the Translate Iowa Project is achieving great success. One of the university’s newest student organizations, the group was formed with the intention of being a culturally and linguistically inclusive creative platform dedicated to the undergraduate translation in literature.”

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/TranslateIowaProject

  7. The Basics of Back Translation

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    The Basics of Back Translation

    “In a previous post, I discussed the various translation services that a company might purchase. In that post, I mentioned back translation, which is the process of translating a target text back into the source language in order to verify that it was translated correctly. In this post, I would like to offer a bit more information about the process and a real-world example where back translation ensured that a client’s message was properly conveyed.”

    Read on: http://bit.ly/BackTranslation

    BENTRANSLATES.WORDPRESS.COM
  8. Interpreting at the 2017 World Baseball Classic

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    Interpreting at the 2017 World Baseball Classic

    “I prepared for this assignment by thoroughly researching baseball terminology with glossaries from Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and the Dominican Republic. This proved to be a challenge, as most Latin American countries are baseball aficionados and have their own terminology….Clearly, my dilemma sent me into a tailspin, and I stuck to universal baseball terminology presented by CNN Deportes en Español.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/InterpretingWorldBaseball

  9. A 103-year-old lexicographer has spent a century thinking about one of India’s oldest languages

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    A 103-year-old lexicographer has spent a century thinking about one of India’s oldest languages

    “Changes to a language are gradual. The casual observer may spot new words or usage here and there, but it’s hard to notice the kinds of fundamental differences that distinguish, for example, the English of 2017 from that of 1917. By observing language for nearly 100 years, [Ganjam Venkatasubbaiah] is a rare expert who can explain these broad changes based on firsthand experience. He told us about the linguistic landscape of South India in the early 1900s, and how the language has changed in his lifetime.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/LexicographerThinking

  10. A Vermont Librarian Who ‘Moonlights’ as Arabic Translator

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    A Vermont Librarian Who ‘Moonlights’ as Arabic Translator

    “Christian Collins appears to be living a double life. By day, he’s a mild-mannered American-born librarian at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. Off the clock, he’s a Canadian resident who uses his fluency in Arabic to help translate the short stories of Syrian writer Osama Alomar into English. Alomar immigrated to Chicago in 2008 and until recently worked as a cabdriver….Since 2009, Collins has worked with the writer—over the phone, at Alomar’s kitchen table and even in his cab, between fares—to translate Alomar’s epigrammatic prose.”

    Read on: http://bit.ly/MoonlightsTranslator