Archive: Sun Jun 2017

  1. Women writers’ work is getting lost in translation

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    Women writers’ work is getting lost in translation

    “The future of feminism is in the transnational, and transnational links can only be made through translation. Women writers the world over should be given a voice, no matter what language they speak and what cultural background they come from.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/WorkGettingLost

  2. The Trick to Translating Rhythm, Tone, and Slang

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    The Trick to Translating Rhythm, Tone, and Slang

    “In an attempt to carry across some of the sonic qualities of the original, I did a few things. A more literal translation of the first sentence might read ‘Lobo approached circles and raised his ear with hunger to learn,’ which would judder the flow. ‘Sidle’ allows for some alliteration, and using ‘thirst’ over ‘hunger’ provides assonance with ‘learn.’ My choices express a desire to create an analogous effect, a means of expressing wonder via sonorous prose.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/TrickTranslating

  3. UCLA historian brings language of the Aztecs from ancient to contemporary times

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    UCLA historian brings language of the Aztecs from ancient to contemporary times

    “The language of the Aztecs, Nahuatl, is undergoing a renaissance in Los Angeles, thanks in part to the efforts of a genial UCLA historian. Once the lingua franca of Mexico, Nahuatl [pronounced na’ wat] was eventually overtaken by Spanish. Today, the indigenous language is spoken only by 1.5 million people in Mexico, many of whom live in the state of Veracruz on the western edge of the Gulf of Mexico. But a modern version of Nahuatl resounds in L.A. At UCLA, students can enroll in beginning and intermediate classes of the language, with an advanced class slated to launch next year.”

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/AztecsAncientContemporary

  4. Stephen Watts on Co-Translation

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    Stephen Watts on Co-Translation

    “There are as many models for co-translation as there are (co-) translators, and so there is no one ‘model.’ But for me, face to face communication is usually really important. There is, of course, great scope in social media, through skyping or e-mailing and this can work very well. But personally, I greatly value being face to face with my co-translators so that I can see and feel the words coming from their mouths and bodies.”

    Learn more: http://bit.ly/CoTranslation

    “Acclaimed poet, editor and translator, Stephen Watts, shares his views on the art and power of co-translation.”
    FREEWORDCENTRE.COM
  5. Elon Musk and linguists say that AI is forcing us to confront the limits of human language

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    Elon Musk and linguists say that AI is forcing us to confront the limits of human language

    “Their ambition is to give a voice to the machine: ‘We want our machines to explain how and why they do what they do.’ This form of communication is to be developed by the machines themselves. With this feedback, researchers will serve as translators who can explain to the public decisions made by the machines. As for human language, Kanai refers to it as ‘the additional difficulty of teaching AIs to express themselves.’ (Incidentally, this assumes that computational models have ‘selves.’) Language is a challenge for artificial intelligence.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/LimitsHumanLanguage

  6. Rescue dog needs bilingual owner because he only understands Polish

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    Rescue dog needs bilingual owner because he only understands Polish

    “Caleb, a four-year-old German shepherd, was thought to be ‘untrainable’ because he could not follow instructions in English. But Dogs Trust Kenilworth discovered he previously had Polish owners, and training sessions revealed he could only understand the Eastern European language….He has started to learn some basic commands in English, but the trust is hoping he is adopted by someone who speaks Polish.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/DogBilingual

  7. Translator competence—Translators and the need for speed

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    Translator competence—Translators and the need for speed

    “In many translator education courses, the focus is placed firmly on encouraging students to reflect fully, to analyze deeply, and to weigh options carefully before committing to a translation strategy, a terminological choice or a turn or phrase. There is no doubt that students must cultivate these deliberate analytical skills, and they must be given the time to develop them. However, in the professional world, there may be less time for careful deliberation. Instead, the translation must come quickly, if not automatically.”

    Read more: http://bit.ly/TranslatorNeedSpeed

    —Translators and the need for speed.
    ATASAVVYNEWCOMER.ORG