Archive: Jul 2017

  1. Millions of Words, Hundreds of Events: Inside FIFA’s Language Service

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    Millions of Words, Hundreds of Events: Inside FIFA’s Language Service

    “You would expect the organizer of what is regarded as the world’s most widely viewed sporting event to have a pretty robust language services department. But the numbers will likely still surprise because, well, it is not easy to truly appreciate what it takes to cater to over three billion World Cup fans (or half the planet) in multiple languages.”

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  2. Chicago Library Seeks Help Transcribing Magical Manuscripts

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    Chicago Library Seeks Help Transcribing Magical Manuscripts

    “Among the library’s collection of rare Bibles and Christian devotional texts are a series of manuscripts that would have scandalized the religious establishment. These texts deal with magic—from casting charms to conjuring spirits—and the Newberry is asking for help translating and transcribing them.”

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  3. My language, my heart

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    My language, my heart

    “Inuinnaqtun could be gone in just two generations. The language (pronounced ee-NOO-ee-NAHK-toon) is traditionally spoken in three Inuit communities in the Western Arctic: Cambridge Bay, Kugluktuk and Ulukhaktok….It’s not clear how many Inuinnaqtun speakers are left….But four determined Inuit women are fighting to revive it—one voice at a time.”

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    “Inuinnaqtun could be gone in just two generations. The language (pronounced ee-NOO-ee-NAHK-toon) is traditionally spoken in three Inuit communities in the Western Arctic: Cambridge Bay, Kugluktuk and Ulukhaktok….It’s not clear how many Inuinnaqtun speakers are left….But four determined Inuit women are fighting to revive it—one voice at a time.”

    Read on—

  4. The Savvy Newcomer Resources page

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    The Savvy Newcomer Resources page

    “It was a genius who said, ‘Never memorize something you can look up.’ But as any good translator or interpreter knows, you have to know where to look it up as well! In this case, you’re in luck: The Savvy Newcomer has done the work for you with our Resources page.”

    Learn more—

    ATASAVVYNEWCOMER.ORG
  5. The future of translation is part human, part machine

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    The future of translation is part human, part machine

    “Today, machine translation can create rough drafts of relatively simple language, and research shows that correcting this draft is usually more efficient than translation from scratch by a human. But machines do not now—and it is questionable whether they ever will be able to—replace a translator’s brain.”

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  6. The Strange, High-Pressure Work of Presidential Interpreters

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    The Strange, High-Pressure Work of Presidential Interpreters

    “The people who help bridge the language gap in meetings like Friday’s Trump-Putin summit serve as confidants, fact-checkers, and de facto diplomats.”

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    During meetings like the Trump-Putin summit on Friday, someone has to bridge the language gap. But who are they, and how do they do their work?
    THEATLANTIC.COM|BY DAVID A. GRAHAM
  7. Tablets for Interpreters: The Device You Didn’t Know You Wanted

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    Tablets for Interpreters: The Device You Didn’t Know You Wanted

    “The latest tablets offer a host of streamlined tools for interpreters, even in high-stakes settings like court and conference interpreting. How can interpreters take advantage of these tools for business tasks, assignment preparation, and consecutive and simultaneous settings? Come along with us for a tour of some of the tools we recommend. After reading this you’ll have a better idea how to incorporate tablet technology into your workflow.”

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  8. When Did Colonial America Gain Linguistic Independence?

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    When Did Colonial America Gain Linguistic Independence?

    “When did Americans start sounding funny to English ears? By the time the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, carefully composed in the richly-worded language of the day, did colonial Americans—who after all were British before they decided to switch to become American—really sound all that different from their counterparts in the mother country?”

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  9. Cardinal Sins of Translation #7: Translating for Free

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    Cardinal Sins of Translation #7: Translating for Free

    “If you have any experience with literary translation, you probably already know that it tends to be more a labor of love than a job that can bring home the ‘big bucks.’ So why would anyone do it for free? I interviewed six translators (for free) to find out. My interviewees were Sue Burke, Mercedes Claire Gilliom, Armine Kotin Mortimer, Anna Schnell, Dorothy Potter Snyder and Patricia Worth.”

  10. The personal peril of being a translator

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    The personal peril of being a translator

    “One doesn’t normally think of translating and editing as a dangerous profession, but my experience of working in this field for the last fifty years has had a deleterious effect on me, leaving me seriously incapacitated. Reading literature of any kind, and especially if it has been translated into or from any of the language pairs between which I work, becomes a major problem, impeding any pleasure I might otherwise have obtained from reading.”

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    “I know that I’m not alone in experiencing what can be called ‘Translator’s Syndrome,’ which is also very much akin to ‘Editor’s Syndrome’ and ‘Proofreader’s Syndrome.'”
    SDJEWISHWORLD.COM