Archive: Jun 2018

  1. Native Language Schools Are Taking Back Education

    Leave a Comment

    Native Language Schools Are Taking Back Education

    “A movement to revitalize tribal languages is underway. The success of ‘Aha Pūnana Leo and promise of Mukayuhsak Weekuw are examples of communities taking education into their own hands. When Native American students are taught in their own language and culture, they succeed.”

    Read more—

    INTERCONTINENTALCRY.ORG
    For more than 150 years, the Wôpanâak language was silent. With no fluent speakers alive, the language of the Mashpee Wampanoag people existed only in historical documents. It was by all measures extinct. But a recently established language school on the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe’s reservation in …
  2. Disney’s ‘Moana’ debuts in Olelo Hawaii at star-studded premiere

    Leave a Comment

    Disney’s ‘Moana’ debuts in Olelo Hawaii at star-studded premiere

    “It’s the first time a Disney movie has ever been re-recorded in Native Hawaiian….The cast also includes 24 Hawaiian-language speaking actors and singers from local communities.”

    Learn more—

    About this article

    HAWAIINEWSNOW.COM
    The Polynesian-themed Disney hit is making its worldwide debut — again. Only this time, everything is in the Hawaiian language.
  3. Deng Xiaoping’s interpreter, valuable eyewitness to China’s four decades of reform and opening-up

    Leave a Comment

    Deng Xiaoping’s interpreter, valuable eyewitness to China’s four decades of reform and opening-up

    “Chen [Feng] said that Deng spoke with a strong Sichuan accent using words or phrases that were very innovative and groundbreaking. He often put forward new ideas in idiomatic colloquial terms that were a challenge both for immediate comprehension and exact interpreting.”

    Read more—

    XINHUANET.COM
    File Photo taken April, 1974 shows Deng Xiaoping, then head of the Delegation of the People’s Republic of China, addressing the Sixth Special Session of the UN General Assembly. (Xinhua/Qian Sijie)
  4. The two really important people at the summit (beside Trump and Kim)

    Leave a Comment

    The two really important people at the summit (beside Trump and Kim)

    “What a crucial job they had. Interpreting at the diplomatic level can be the difference between finding peace or causing an international incident. Every word uttered by a world leader had to be interpreted and relayed to the other with exacting context and nuance.”

    Read on—

    About this article

    CNN.COM
    She’s a longtime State Department employee; he’s a member of North Korea’s Foreign Ministry. They made sure Trump and Kim understood each other.
  5. Meet the ‘Unsung Hero’ Who Interpreted for President Trump During His 1-on-1 With Kim Jong Un

    Leave a Comment

    Meet the ‘Unsung Hero’ Who Interpreted for President Trump During His 1-on-1 With Kim Jong Un

    “[Yun Hyang Lee] doesn’t try to be the star of the show, she says in the background….She’s very attuned to getting the interpretation and translation right rather than being more involved than she has to be.”

    Read more—

    About this article

    TIME.COM
  6. Egyptian linguist Hussein Mahmoud: ‘Translation is the best medium for dialogue between civilisations’

    Leave a Comment

    Egyptian linguist Hussein Mahmoud: ‘Translation is the best medium for dialogue between civilisations’

    “Through translation, one nation can form a better mental image of another nation. Translation is like immigration but through literature…It is physically impossible for Naguib Mahfouz to sit down with Lorca or Marquez or Tolstoy and agree on the universal human values they could treat in their works. Translation does that.”

    Read more—

  7. Study Reveals Brain Activity Patterns Underlying Fluent Speech

    Leave a Comment

    Study Reveals Brain Activity Patterns Underlying Fluent Speech

    “The findings, which extend previous studies on how the brain interprets the sounds of spoken language, could help guide the creation of new generation of prosthetic devices for those who are unable to speak: brain implants could monitor neural activity related to speech production and rapidly and directly translate those signals into synthetic spoken language.”

    Read more—

    UCSF.EDU
    The new research reveals that the brain’s speech centers are organized more according to the physical needs of the vocal tract as it produces speech than by how the speech sounds.
  8. Greatest Women in Translation: Jen Calleja (interview)

    Leave a Comment

    Greatest Women in Translation: Jen Calleja (interview)

    “Coming from a DIY music and grassroots activism background has informed my compulsion to demystify translation and empower people to try translating who may not have thought it was—as a thing or as a practice—’for them.'”

    Read more—

    CAROLTRANSLATION.COM
    This month, I talk to Jen Calleja, British writer and literary translator.
  9. The Pressures Of Being An Interpreter At A High-Stakes Summit

    Leave a Comment

    The Pressures Of Being An Interpreter At A High-Stakes Summit

    “In closed-door meetings at the highest level, interpreters face the pressures of global diplomacy.”

    Read more—

    About this article

    NPR.ORG
    President Trump doesn’t speak Korean and little is known about Kim Jong Un’s English skills. The best interpreters serve as both linguists and diplomats. They understand the politics behind the words.